Are You Helping Someone?

Are You Helping Someone Who is Depressed or Anxious?

It can be incredibly difficult watching someone you know or love struggle with depression or anxiety. It may be that you were one of the first people to notice the difference in how they were – long before they noticed it themselves – or that you have tried to offer support but not always found the right things to say or do.

It can be incredibly difficult watching someone you know or love struggle with depression or anxiety. It may be that you were one of the first people to notice the difference in how they were – long before they noticed it themselves – or that you have tried to offer support but not always found the right things to say or do.

Alternatively, it might be the person themself has realised they are depressed and/or anxious but cannot find the right way, or right time, to talk about it. Noticing the early signs of depression can be really important in creating a space in which the person can find the right support. Being able to talk honestly about feelings, without judgement or criticism, can be invaluable in helping someone to feel stronger, or to take the steps they need to make changes.

Ultimately, being concerned about someone’s safety – fearing their thoughts of suicide – can be of the greatest concern. Again, having the confidence to talk about suicide with someone you are supporting can be one of the biggest first steps in helping them feel safe.

The purpose of this section is to provide you with some information that might help you to help others. Whether you are a partner, friend, colleague or a friend-of-a-friend, or whether you are a professional wanting to know more about depression and anxiety, there is information here – which will be added to and updated frequently – to inform you and help you think about what you might usefully be able to offer someone.

There is information available about:

Noticing the Signs
Responding to Suicide Risk
Research and Evidence
Resources