I Need Help Now

I Need Help Now

Sometimes we can hit a crisis point, where we cannot imagine how we can carry on. It is hard to define what a crisis is, as it can be very different for each person.

Food is Not the Enemy – Steph Elswood

Steph Elswood trained as a dancer from a young age. She felt under pressure to compete with her peers and wanted to be the ‘skinny girl’. But seeing food as the enemy left her ill and suffering from panic attacks. Counselling and learning to cook creative and healthy food has brought her a new attitude and a new career as @HealthyChefSteph. She says ‘The only person you can rely on to be kind to yourself is you.’ Steph’s now determined to use social media as a positive force. She wants to encourage others and lift them up. Steph shares her tips for feeling kind towards yourself.

www.headtalks.com


However, it is often the point at which we can be overwhelmed, or struggle to contain our feelings; or perhaps we might experience new and distressing symptoms, such as hearing voices. It is not uncommon at a crisis point to feel that we might harm ourselves to cope, or that we are contemplating ending our life.

If you feel suicidal NOW, there are things you can do to access help. Most people who feel suicidal and access help are grateful they were able to talk to someone and not act on their thoughts.

Talk to a friend, a partner, a counsellor, or your GP, for example, and tell them clearly that you are at risk to yourself. People who are there to help you will not judge you or think you weak; rather, they will talk with you about the right sort of support you need to help you through the crisis period.

When to Act

It is important to talk to someone you trust, or seek help from a GP or a counsellor, if you have any suicidal feelings at any point. Getting the right support early can play an important part in preventing things from becoming worse.

However, it is important to act immediately if:

  • You feel that your suicidal thoughts are immediate and/or beyond your control
  • Your thoughts about suicide might inadvertently put others at risk
  • You have already done something that might put your life at risk, e.g., overdosed

Call 999 and ask for immediate help, telling the emergency operator your name, date of birth, address, any actions you have already taken, and about your feelings of suicide. If you can safely get to an Accident and Emergency Department yourself, do so immediately.

You can also ring someone if you need to talk to someone now, or while you wait for help to arrive. Helplines can include:

Samaritans
Telephone: 116 123 (free line)
Email: jo@samaritans.org

Papyrus HOPELine
Telephone: 0800 068 41 41 (free line)